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About the Deuterium Depletion - Research and development

Each year 12.7 million people realize they have cancer and 7.6 million people die from the disease. The World Health Organization (WHO) projects that without immediate action the global number of deaths from cancer will increase by nearly 80 per cent by 2030 (13.7 million deaths).

HYD's approach to deuterium depletion of water and other molecules has broad potential to enhance the effectiveness of the presently available oncotherapies, and result in innovative new medicines and consumer products for the treatment and prevention of cancer.

In the ’70s Nobel laureate Albert Szent-Györgyi assumed that the real cause of cancer can be found at submolecular level. Szent-Györgyi's approach to cancer grew out of his longstanding belief that the numerous subtle processes in living systems must depend not only on "clumsy macromolecules" that make up body structures, but on small, highly mobile and responsive entities: delocalized electrons.

In the early ’90s, Hungarian molecular biologist, Gábor Somlyai, PhD recognized that the shortage of deuterium can cause significant changes in cell processes. The most important outcome of this research carried out with deuterium-depleted water (DDW) was that tumour cells proved to be extremely sensitive to the withdrawal of D. According to these scientific results, not the negatively charged electron but its positively charged counterpart, hydrogen and its heavy isotope, deuterium can fulfill this central role in cell regulation.

The results clearly showed that a sub-molecular regulatory system exists in the cells, which serves a new target for drug development. HYD's approach to deuterium depletion of water and other molecules has broad potential to enhance the effectiveness of the presently available oncotherapies and results in innovative new medicines.

Recent research shows that the application of deuterium depletion can cover other indication fields such as diabetes.
 
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Source: hyd.hu 
 
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